Power of Attorney

Edwardsville Powers of Attorney Attorneys


These include power of attorneys for health care, power of attorneys for property, durable power of attorneys, limited power of attorneys, and living wills and other documents. These documents can be customized to fit the exact nature and circumstances of the factual situation involving a client. Executing a Power of Attorney does not mean that you can no longer make decisions; it just means that another person can act for you also. As long as you are capable of making decisions, the other person must follow your directions. You are simply sharing your power with someone else. You can revoke the agent’s authority under the Power of Attorney at any time after you become dissatisfied with what they are doing. The person to whom you give these powers is called an “agent.” You are called the “principal.” Just because the word attorney is used does not mean that the person you give authority to has to be a lawyer. An Attorney-In-fact must keep your money separate from his or her own. He or she must not personally be involved and/or stand to profit by any transaction where he or she represents your interests. He or she must keep separate and accurate records regarding all transactions he or she engages in for your benefit. A Power of Attorney ends upon death. Therefore, your will, or the law of intestacy, governs the handling of your estate. A Power of Attorney document is not a substitute for a will.